Ri general laws post dating checks


In most localities it is necessary to file a complaint with the appropriate criminal justice officer such as a sheriff or district attorney to initiate criminal legal action.

Although worthless check laws can vary somewhat from one state to another, all states make it illegal for a person to write a worthless check with the intent to defraud a person or business of goods or services. Typical worthless check laws are written so that the criminal intent requirement necessary for a conviction is satisfied if the prosecutor proves the existence of one or more conditions or facts specified by the statute. Punishment for committing check fraud, including fraud committed with a postdated check, can vary from state to state, but the laws typically authorize fines, probation, and even imprisonment.

The maker of the postdated check must have the intent to defraud at the time of writing the postdated check. For example, under Georgia’s deposit account fraud statute, the defendant is presumed to have written the check with the knowledge it would bounce if: The fact that a postdated check is not honored because of insufficient funds does not, by itself, establish that the maker of the check committed a crime; the prosecutor must prove that the defendant had the intent to defraud at the time of writing the worthless check. A defendant also will have to make restitution to the victim for goods or services received with the bad check.

The prescribed numbers of days for the various states are:- 5 Days In many states the criminal provisions regarding bad checks do not apply to post-dated checks.

Because post-dated checks are a promise to pay in the future, they are not technically viewed as checks.

In states that make a distinction regarding a felony or misdemeanor, the amount of the check usually determines if the crime is a misdemeanor or a felony.